muslim adoption

Ramadan: The month of Blessing

Ramadan is the ninth month of the Islamic lunar calendar, and is believed to be the month in which the Holy Quran was revealed to the prophet Muhammad.  It is one of the holiest celebrations in Islam, honored with worship, prayer, and fasting. This year, Ramadan will start at sundown on Friday, the 20th of July and will continue for 30 days until Saturday, the 18th of August.

Fasting, called Sawmn, during the month of Ramadan is one of the Five Pillars of Islam. The month is spent by fasting during the daylight hours between dawn and sunset, and then breaking the fast with a ritualistic meal called Iftar. Children remain exempt from fasting during Ramadan until they reach pre-adolescence, but do enjoy partaking in reflection, worship, and celebrations, which are also important parts of Ramadan.

Families begin their Iftar meals by eating sweet dates and honeyed pastries before reciting the Maghrib prayer, afterwards they eat and fellowship with other families and friends. While fasting may sound miserable to some of us, Muslims have a very positive outlook with gratitude for their blessings in life as they reflect on those who may not have the things they do.

This month is a time of renewal, self-reflection, and devotion to God. Muslims use this time to strengthen their connection to God and Islam, through daily prayer and recitations of the Quran, as well as to their families and community. While Muslims abstain from eating during the fasting hours of Ramdan, they are also required to abstain from gossiping, lying, fighting, and all other “traits of bad character.”

After the thirty-day fast is over, on the first day of Shawwl, Muslims hold a large celebration known as “Eid ul-Fitr or the Festival of Breaking Fast.”

ASMA Society

In April we had a visit from Sabeeha Rehman and Daisy Khan from the ASMA Society. ASMA Society is a New-York based nonprofit organization whose mission is to elevate the discourse on Islam and foster environments in which Muslims thrive.  Their women’s Shura Council has recently published a paper focused entirely on Islam and Adoption, which we found both instructive and fascinating.

Both Spence-Chapin and the ASMA Society were delighted to see how our goals coincide, and we are thrilled to partner with this organization to learn more about their work, educate them about ours, and recruit families to adopt children in Morocco.

 

Muslim,ASMA,

Morocco Program Update March 2012

We continue to be extremely optimistic about the launch of our newest program in Morocco, and the relationships that we have forged with three orphanages across the country. Recruitment of Muslim families for this program continues to be our highest priority as we seek additional pilot families to join those already in process. Please tell anyone you know who might be interested to call us at 212-400-8150 for more info! Spence-Chapin has been asked to find families for a number of waiting boys and girls ranging in age from 6-12. These children are ready to be immediately matched with families through our School-Aged Children Placement Initiative. Families for these children must meet the Moroccan-eligibility guidelines outlined on our website.

Morocco is a spectacularly beautiful country that is the focus of all kinds of art and literature, providing inspiration for creative people from all corners of the world. Check out a few books for kids and adults alike:

Morocco Program Update - February 2012

Spence-Chapin’s Morocco Pilot Program has officially launched and we are delighted to have our first 2 pioneer families beginning the home study process with us at this time!  We are enormously excited about the potential of this program to match Moroccan children with Muslim families here in the United States, and we are looking forward to learning the nuances of the overseas process with the help of our pioneers.  Our outreach efforts continue full-force as we look to expand our group of pioneer families.  We are particularly eager to connect with families who may be interested in adopting toddlers and older children from Morocco in addition to the young infants available in this program. We are particularly enthusiastic about our collaboration with the ASMA Society, a New-York based nonprofit organization whose mission is to elevate the discourse on Islam and foster environments in which Muslims thrive.  Their women’s Shura Council has recently published a paper focused entirely on Islam and Adoption, which we found both instructive and fascinating.  Both Spence-Chapin and the ASMA Society were delighted to see how our goals coincide, and we are thrilled to partner with this organization to learn more about their work, educate them about ours, and recruit families to adopt children in Morocco.